B&W with wide angle lens: Natchitoches and Plaquemines Parishes

This is actually in NOLA, one of the cemeteries in Central City:

St. Joseph cemetery

Slave cabins of Magnolia Plantation near Natchitoches:

Magnolia Plantation

Magnolia Plantation

Grave house at Bay Springs Cemetery in Natchitoches Parish:

Bay Springs Cemetery

Unknown graves at a cemetery in Venice, LA:

Unknown graves

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Kodak Ektar in Smena 8M: Plaquemines Parish

Venice, LA

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Harlem Plantation

Harlem Plantation

Violet, LA

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B&W with wide angle: Plaquemines Parish, LA

The end of LA-23 past the town of Venice:

Dead cypress trees

Plaquemines Parish courthouse in Point a la Hache. This burned down in the 1990s and they’re finally re-building it.

Plaquemines parish courthouse

The clock tower of the courthouse:

Plaquemines Parish courthouse

Harlem Plantation:

Harlem Plantation

From the other side:

Harlem Plantation

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Harlem Plantation, Plaquemines Parish, LA

I found out about this house while Googling for things to photograph in Plaquemines Parish. There isn’t much information on the internet other than that it was built in 1840 and is considered architecturally significant as an example of the shift from French Colonial to Classical architecture in south Louisiana. I have no idea who owns it now, but it obviously hasn’t been lived in in decades. Sad to say, but I think this one is beyond saving. I wasn’t even 100% sure it would still be there when I set out, the most recent photo I was able to find was the Google Street View for that stretch of Louisiana Highway 15, dated October of 2013. But it was right where the GPS coordinates said it would be.

I didn’t have very good light, it was midday on a totally cloudless day so it was very hard. These are just my cell phone shots, I also shot some B&W in my Viv and Ektar in my Argus C3—haven’t taken that one out in a while. I forgot what a satisfying “ping!” the shutter on that one makes.

Harlem Plantation

Harlem Plantation

Harlem Plantation

Harlem Plantation

Harlem Plantation

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Old house on the River Road, Pointe a la Hache, LA

Between Katrina and the Deepwater Horizon, Pointe a la Hache lost over 50% of its population, so there are a lot of abandoned properties in the town, especially along LA-15, which runs parallel to the east bank of the Mississippi River. Hope and I picked one more or less at random to photograph.

Old House

There was some damage around to the back of the house, nothing that looked like it would be impossible to fix. But if whoever lived there lost a steady income thanks to the oil spill, maybe they couldn’t afford even minor repair. Or maybe they just couldn’t afford to keep it up; those old houses need constant repair, and they are really hard to heat and cool. It’s sadly ironic that what made them suitable for the climate in the days before central air/heat—raised off the ground, high ceilings—now makes artificially cooled/heated air leak out of them like water through a fishnet. Too, since the levees were built they don’t get as much natural a/c from river breezes. And of course insulation has come a long way in the last 100 years.

Old House

Someone’s keeping the property mowed, but the house is starting to both sink and crack, and vines are growing over the outside. Left to itself, it will be unrepairable within not too many more years.

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St. Thomas Cemetery, Pointe a la Hache, LA

St. Thomas Cemetery

The cemetery wasn’t all that interesting, but I liked these peeling old statues found at the back.

St. Thomas Cemetery

St. Thomas Cemetery

The weird swirl they elected to use in place of an O gave me True Detective flashbacks.

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Lomographers of Acadiana: Pointe a la Hache, LA

I had my photography group’s meetup here last month. Pointe a la Hache is the parish seat, but since Katrina and the Deepwater Horizon it’s almost a ghost town. It’s right on the east bank of the Mississippi and the primary business was fishing, so both of those things really hurt the town. There are less than 200 people living there these days, and the only business left is a combination diner/convenience store. (Unless you count the Catholic church.)

The damage to the courthouse precedes the hurricane, though. Some idiot who was about to go on trial in 2002 decided that burning down the courthouse would be a good way to destroy the evidence against him; instead he was convicted of his original crime AND arson. Parish business is now conducted in the town of Belle Chasse; there have been several ballot measures to move the seat there officially but they always get rejected. Sentimental reasons, I suppose.

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Jail

Plaquemines Parish Courthouse

Plaqumines Parish Courthouse

Plaquemines Parish Jail

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