Fountains pens #3

It’s full! Actually, since I usually carry 2 or 3 pens in my carry case, and leave another pen or two out on my desk at home, it’s more than full.

Fountain pens #3

Left to right:

  • Jinhao 159. My latest purchase, I just got this last night. Like all Jinhaos, less than $10.
  • Kaweco Skyline Sport. I recently did an eyedropper conversion on this because the dinky little squeeze converter only holds a DROP of ink. It’s a very nice mint green color that never shows up in photographs.
  • Vintage Sheaffer. This was a gift from a pen friend in Canada.
  • Pilot Prera. I got this to replace my old ivory-colored Prera, which I dropped on our stupid tile floor. This is one of my favorite pens.
  • Esterbrook J. I bought this off another pen friend for cheap. A classic mid-20th century pen.
  • Jinhao X750. I bought this pen specifically to use the new J. Herbin 1670 ink, Emerald of Chivor, in. I use another 1670 ink, Rouge Hematite, in my gold X750.
  • Bexley Imperial. This is my most expensive pen, although I bought it through Massdrop and didn’t pay full retail.
  • Platinum Plaisir. Came with a broken converter so I use cartridges in it.
  • Sheaffer 100. I had this inked with Diamine Ancient Copper for a long time, but recently cleaned it and took it out of rotation for a while.

And I just realized that my Kaweco Liliput Brass is nowhere to be found, it’s tiny so it tends to get lost in the wraps.

Not my photo

Not my photo

Aaaaand after the Dallas Pen Show (pens I bought at that shown in a previous blog) I think I’m going to take it easy for a while. I still get emails from Massdrop, but I haven’t seen anything since the Liliput that I NEED to have. The new special edition Vanishing Point was released this week, and it’s gorgeous, but the best price I’ve found is $192 and I’m happy with the VP I just bought in Dallas. Maybe if it’s still around at Christmas, I’ll ask all of my family members to go in on it together. (My birthday money is already earmarked for some Soviet cameras.)

Fountain pens, part 2

fountain pens 2

Left to right:

  • Eversharp Doric: This was my first real vintage pen, which I found for about 1/3 of its actual value of one of my favorite stores in Breaux Bridge.
  • Ohto Tasche: This is what’s sometimes called a “vest pen”, in that it’s very small, but when you post the cap it makes it regular-sized.
  • Pelikan Pelikano: Pelikan is another swanky brand (a German one) that is too expensive for me to bother with. The Pelikano is a child’s pen.
  • Pilot Petit 1: These were my entry back into fountain pens after many years away, when I found them at Kinokuniya Books in Japantown.
  • Pilot Cavalier: This is my most “ladylike” pen.
  • Sheaffer Balance: This is one of my oldest pens, both it and the Doric are from the 1930s.
  • Parker Urban: My only all-black pen.
  • Everysharp Skyline: This is the model that came after the Doric. I love this design, which I find very “dieselpunk”.
  • Parker 51: One of the most-collected vintage pens in existence. I got this for scandalously cheap in an eBay auction.

Let no one say I don’t fully commit to my weird obsessions!

Hey, did you know that old cameras aren’t the only kind of obsolete technology I collect? I’ve also collected fountain pens for a few years now, and lately have been getting more into vintage pens. That culminated this weekend with my getting up at 5:00 am on Saturday and driving 6 1/2 hours to attend the Little Rock Pen show–basically just one room in the Riverfront Wyndham. But you know, pens are small, and one small-ish conference room crammed with tables of them is still a LOT of pens.

fountain pens

I gave myself a budget of $200 and that’s what I spent, to the penny.

Left to right:

The black pen with mother-of-pearl chips is a Sheaffer Balance from the 1930s. Sheaffers are like the Kodak of mid-century fountain pens. This is my 2nd vintage Sheaffer (I also have a modern Sheaffer 100); a while back a pen friend gave me a brown Sheaffer Craftsman from the 1950s. (If Sheaffer is Kodak, than the Craftsman is the Brownie; they churned out millions of them over the decades surrounding WWII and they’re still floating all over the place.) Like the Craftsman, this is a lever fill. It has new ink sac and a NOS Sheaffer #3 nib, which is about about a modern M-F nib.

The blue and orange pen is a Bexley BX701 in Blue Shimmer. I’m having a hard time pinning down when this series was made, although I can say it’s no longer in production. Bexley was founded in 1993 by a group of vintage pen enthusiasts/refurbishers, so it’s not real old. They are known for oversize pens in funky color designs; I’ve always wanted one but the fact that literally every one I’ve ever seen is amazeballs is kind of why I’ve never bought one. However, blue and orange is one of my favorite color combos, so as soon as I saw this one I knew it was the Bexley for me. It’s NOS with the original M nib (although it’s a large nib for a large pen, and the Bexley M is almost a B in any other pen) and a new converter.

Both of these pens were $100 each, but they were being sold by the same seller so I was like I got cash, make me a deal. And he gave me the pair for $150.

…Which left me with $50 to spend on the green and black pen, a piston-fill Reform 1745 with a custom ground .09mm italic nib. This is in no way an expensive pen, that price was for the grinding, which if done wrong can ruin a pen. I tried their tester pen and wow, worth every penny.