Another weekend on the River Road

Specifically, LA-44.

In my never-ending quest to go to all of the festivals in Louisiana at least once (or at least, the ones that I think sound interesting), on Saturday I went to Frisco Fest, at the San Francisco Plantation in Garyville. I’ve been to the plantation before; in fact, a photo that I took of it is the header image I use for my Facebook page. Frisco Fest is a local arts and crafts festival, and I always like to what my fellow artists are making. I left with 3 bottles of fruit wine (made in Independence, LA), a set of embroidered flour sack dishcloths (made in Metairie, LA), and a pottery ikebana vase (made in Gonzales, LA). I was so impressed with the quality of the goods being sold that I talked Mom into going on Sunday.

Then I drove a little ways down the road to the remains of Tezcuco Plantation, built in 1855 and destroyed by fire in 2002. These are just cell shots but I also took some film shots.

Tezcuco Plantation

Okay yeah, I totally hopped the fence. It’s like knee-high and there are 2-foot gaps around several trees, how could I resist?

Tezcuco Plantation

Tezcuco Plantation

Tezcuco Plantation

Tezcuco Plantation

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Random stuff: Kodak Ektar in the Ultra Wide & Slim

Adam's Fruit Stand

Adam’s Fruit Stand in Matthews

New Canal Lighthouse

New Canal Lighthouse, Lake Pontchartrain, NOLA

Leeville Cemetery

Leeville Cemetery

Moresi Foundry

Moresi Foundry, Jeanerette

St. Roch shrine

St. Roch Shrine, NOLA

Steamboat house

Steamboat House, Holy Cross, NOLA

Association tomb

Association Tomb, Valence Street Cemetery, NOLA

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Edgard, LA: Slightly expired Fuji Neopan in the Yashica MG-1

More adventures along the River Road with my Yashica. I really like shooting black and white in this camera. Although the roll I’m currently working my way through is in the Ultra Wide & Slim; I’ve never shot Neopan in that before so I’m curious to see the results. Hopefully we have decent weather this weekend (Sunday looks better than Saturday so far) and I can finish it up. I’m also waiting for this book to arrive from Amazon (should be today), which hopefully will give me some more ideas. I picked up the Mississippi edition last weekend and have already marked several pages!

Slave cabins

Caire's Landing

Old grocery store

Caire's Landing

Slave cabins

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Nottoway Plantation (grounds), White Castle, Louisiana

view from 2nd story balcony

View from the 2nd story balcony. The road is LA-405, part of the River Road that parallels the Mississippi River and runs from New Orleans to Baton Rouge—we refer to it as one road, but it really changes depending on what parish you’re in. I love this particular stretch of it and have taken many photos along it. Beyond that of course is the levee and the river itself; the trees you can see are actually an island and not the far bank. The Mississippi is much wider than that.

plantation grounds

The old slave cabins in the background are now hotel rooms, which umm I find rather tacky but whatever. Anyway I’m pretty sure they’re reproductions; a lot of these old plantations let the slave quarters fall apart after the Civil War even if they kept up the main house, for obvious reasons.

Randolph family cemetery

In the background you can make out the Randolph family cemetery, the last burial there was in 1944. It would be kind of weird to buy a house and be responsible for tending another family’s graves.

Nottoway Plantation

The hill on the other side of the gate is the levee.

Nottoway Plantation

This would have been considered the front of the house, the side that faced the river, when it was built.

Nottoway Plantation

The curved part is where the ballroom is, and the ground floor of that section is now a restaurant. It was unusual for a rich planter to have an asymmetrical house in those days, when architects were churning out one Greek Revival after another throughout the deep south, but apparently Randolph wanted his house to stand out. When people passed it on the river, he wanted everyone to know who it belonged to.

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