Crown of Success Oil

Crown of Success Oil

This is another complex oil, I think of it as kind of like the offensive counterpart to the defensive Fiery Wall of Protection Oil. It’s only used for positive works, though. It’s especially good for adults returning to school and people who run their own businesses, but it can be used in any situation where you desire to succeed.

There are a lot of ingredients in it. Mine has more oils than a lot of other rootworkers might use; I don’t like to have a lot of solids in my oils and if I can use the essential oil instead of dried herbs I usually will.

I used orange, allspice, cinnamon, geranium, lavender, bergamot, and rosemary oils; you could use dried herbals for the lavender, bergamot, and/or rosemary if you wanted. I added a pinch of anise seed, a small piece of High John the Conqueror root, and a chunk of pyrite. I’ve read of some rootworkers using a pinch of gold glitter, but glitter is made of plastic (sorry to bust your bubble if you thought it was made of unicorn farts) and I only want organic ingredients in my oils.

The bottle is from World Market, they have a good selection of small bottles for just $1.99.

Crown of Success can be used in candle spells (purple would be the right color here), used to dress things like resumes or business cards or school papers (dab a bit on each corner), or used as a personal fragrance. It’s got a really complex, but clean and bright, smell.

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Peaceful Home Oil

Peaceful Home Oil

This one is not, as the kids say, canon. I started with a base of the traditional oil ingredients, but mine has a few extra.

The 3 traditional ingredients for Peaceful Home Oil are lavender, rosemary, and pennyroyal. I used essential oils for the rosemary and lavender, but a local essential oil company mildly freaked out on me when I inquired on their Facebook page if they carried pennyroyal essential oil. They were like NOOOOO THAT DAMAGES YOUR LUNGS IN EVEN SMALL AMOUNTS DO NOT USE IT IN AROMATHERAPY, which was weird because I thought even in aromatherapy they diluted the oils? Undiluted essential oils are overpowering at the very least, and a lot of them can be irritants or even harmful. Anyway, I was like uhhh chill, it would be diluted in a large amount of carrier, but thanks, I’ll just go elsewhere. Anyway, I decided to use it a dried herb instead of an oil.

To the rosemary and lavender oils I added sandalwood oil, which is associated in Hoodoo with happy homes and keeping out evil. And to the pennyroyal I added a pinch of shredded angelica root, which is a powerful guardian and healer; and a small piece of pyrite, because what do (adult) members of a household argue about more than money? The carrier I used was sweet almond oil.

Blue is the color in Hoodoo that corresponds with family matters and spiritual peace, so of course I decided to put it in the little blue bottle that I bought last month. It probably contained medicine of some sort originally. Like the bottle I used for the Uncrossing Oil, the original cork was long gone, so I whittled down a wine cork, then dripped melted sealing wax over the top. Keeping oils in dark glass bottles is practical too, because it keeps out light. Light will makes oils get rancid faster.

So this is my own personal recipe for a supercharged Peaceful Home Oil. It can be used for dressing candles, anointing objects used in Peaceful Home spells, added to floor washes or bathwater. Use it, share it, I would prefer you not sell it but realistically it’s not like I would know.

Special Oil No. 20

special oil no 20

This is a really simple, classic Conjure oil that I threw together yesterday. Special Oil No. 20 (sometimes called Wick Oil, Candle Oil, or Brown Oil) is patchouli and vanilla. In the old days it was made with patchouli leaves and vanilla pods, which is how it got its brown color; nowadays it’s more commonly made with essential oils and dyed brown.

Some rootworkers add this or that herb or root or maybe another oil; but in its simplest form it’s just the two essential oils, a carrier oil, and your prayers. I knew this had patchouli and vanilla in it, but thought there must be a 3rd ingredient that I couldn’t detect with my nose. Luckily a more experienced rootworker in my Facebook group clued me in. (I had also made the mistake of wandering into an old Yahoo! group that was clearly populated by fluffybunny Wiccan types, they kept insisting Special Oil No. 20 has at least one floral note.)

Vanilla is one of the most positive scents in Hoodoo, it encourages love–one of the simplest and most popular Hoodoo spells is to keep a vanilla pod in the family sugar bowl. And patchouli is one of the most versatile scents, used to draw both love and money and to break jinxes, so it’s almost always found in “multi-purpose” oils. Therefore, Special Oil No. 20 is appropriate for use in any positive or defensive workings. But not “left-handed”* work!

*One of the most striking differences between Hoodoo and Wicca is that Hoodoo has no equivalent to Wicca’s “Rule of Three”. Hoodoo is a belief system of poor and marginalized people who read the Bible if they read nothing else, and anger and revenge–or just needing to get people out of your life–definitely have a place in it.

XXX Algiers Oil

Making Hoodoo/Conjure oils is something I’ve recently become interested in. I always had an interest in New Orleans Voodoo and usually had some oils from this or that NOLA botanica around; but since Granny died my desire to know more about it has grown. Like a lot of elderly people in south Louisiana, my grandmother had some Hoodoo beliefs, although she always thought of herself as a Catholic (not that the two things are mutually exclusive).

And of course in Cajun culture there is a long tradition of traiteurs/traiteuses. That’s a kind of faith healing that mostly uses the “laying on of hands”, although a lot of them also use various herbal or otherwise natural remedies. (To get rid of a wart, rub it on a cut potato and bury it at a crossroads, etc.) My mother was a spastic child who was always falling off roofs and whatnot, so I know she got dragged to one by Granny at least once.

It’s a rewarding hobby, and an inexpensive one too: essential oils are almost always less than $5 a dram (1/4 of an ounce), and you only need a few drops to make a whole ounce of oil. Essential oils are overpowering and can even be harmful in their undiluted form, so you always want to use a neutral carrier oil. Old school rootworkers will say you have to use olive oil, but I think it makes everything smell like salad dressing and I use sweet almond oil. Jojoba oil is also a popular choice with younger rootworkers. And I squeeze a vitamin E gelcap into every bottle, which keeps the oil fresh longer.

If you’re a cook with wide interests (like me), you’ll already have a lot of the herbal ingredients in your pantry. More obscure ingredients like lodestone gravel or angelica root can be obtained at botanicas, or online, for a few dollars. Etsy has lots of spiritual supply shops.

xxx algiers oil

I made this yesterday, it’s XXX Algiers Oil (usually spoken as Triple Strength Algiers Oil). It’s a great multi-purpose oil that originated in the Algiers neighborhood of NOLA. Most “condition” oils are meant to remedy one condition: get you a job, win you a court case, make your man stop straying. But XXX Algiers Oil is supposed to attract love, luck, and money–hence the XXX in the title. It’s a fun oil to make because the roots/herbs/etc. you put in the oil are up to you, so long as you use one each to attract the three conditions. You can use it to dress candles or anoint petition papers or as a perfume (it’s a unisex scent).

Most rootworkers will not share their formulas, but I say fuck that. I’m not looking to make any money off this, and sharing knowledge is never a bad thing. (Anyway, XXX Algiers Oil is not a big secret.) The essential oils are patchouli, cinnamon, vanilla, and wintergreen–essentially it’s Red Fast Luck Oil with the earthy patchouli added to “slow down” the oil. (Red Fast Luck works fast, as the name implies, but the results don’t last long.) I combined the patchouli, wintergreen, and vanilla in more or less equal amounts, but I find cinnamon oil has a REALLY strong smell and I put in a little less of it.

In the bottle, before I poured in the oil, I placed a pinch of lavender flowers for love; a few nutmeg shavings for luck; and a small piece of pyrite for money. I chose a love herb that’s slanted more towards promoting familial peace and harmony, as opposed to an outright romantic one like rose buds. Of course, any plant parts you put in oils have to be ABSOLUTELY DRY, or your oil will go rancid. A good resource for the different meanings of plants, minerals, and zoological material is Catherine Yronwode’s* Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic.

I bought several small bottles at the Washington Schoolhouse Antiques sale last weekend (I haven’t missed one of the semi-annual sales–there’s another one in April–since I moved to Louisiana), with the purpose of using them for oils. They’re all different shapes and colors, but all hold about one ounce. I spent all weekend soaking them first in hot soapy water, then diluted vinegar, then water scented with Florida Water, then finally just water. In between I scrubbed them out by wrapping bits of cloth around a wooden skewer. This bottle is actually an orphan salt shaker, I made it airtight by coating the inside of the shaker top with silver sealing wax and rubbing the threads with soft orthodontic wax.

I’m waiting on another batch of essential oils, and next week I’m going to make Peaceful Home Oil.

*I refuse to get involved in the American Hoodoo/NOLA Voodoo pissing matches, so any comments slamming either Cat Yronwode OR Denise Alvarado will not be approved. Everyone involved needs to just do what they do and stop trying to prove their way is the One True Faith.