Our Lady of Tickfaw, Tangipahoa Parish

This is something I read about in Weird Louisiana, although I made sure to Google it first because a lot of the information in that book is outdated. (Or just plain wrong, like that old chestnut about St. Expedite getting his name because the nuns mistook the word expidite for a name.) The most recent mention I found online was from last November; photos showed it to be neglected and overgrown but mostly still standing. Whoever owns the land has apparently sold off part of it though, because the back part of the field was fenced off with some pretty strongly worded No Trespassing signs. Too bad, because I could see more statuary and a little chapel back in the trees. Kind of a dick move to buy that, leave it up and not do anything with the land, but cut it off from the public.

These are just a few cell phone shots; I hope the film I shot turns out because it was more overcast than predicted and I was shooting all fairly low speed film. I finished the roll of Velvia in the Ultra Wide & Slim–I think I’m going to get that processed as slide rather than cross-processed. Like multi-lens cameras, cross-processing is a gimmick that I feel like I’ve just grown out of. I also shot some Ektar in the Smena 8M, and took a few Neopan shots in the Blackbird fly.

Our Lady of Tickfaw

Our Lady of Tickfaw

Our Lady of Tickfaw

You know, so much of the photos I’ve shot for the Saints of Louisiana project have been privately built devotional spaces not owned by or officially connected with any church, I wonder if that shouldn’t be the focus of the project? I have a lot of photography/coffee table books about Louisiana, and while religious subjects are often covered, I don’t think a focus on these kinds of chapels/shrines has ever been done before. You could even argue that Marie Laveau’s tomb falls under that category, because while it’s in a graveyard owned by the diocese, it was the actions of private worshipers who turned it into a shrine.

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